Posts Tagged ‘haiti’

Wyclef! Haiti needs a president, not a savior!

August 6, 2010

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-479427

Wyclef made several key mistakes in his speech about the presidency of Haiti. He came off as more arrogant than passionate. He painted Haiti as if it needed him. He also referred to himself as a “young youth”. He’s 40. That’s not young. He also spoke about needing to win abroad as being almost more important than winning in Haiti. He needs to brush up on his history because many of Haiti’s problems stem from its relations with the international community. Furthermore, he says doesn’t really want to run but the youth “drafted” him. He should realize that he can serve his country in other ways. He shouldn’t run if he really doesn’t want to. Lastly, from one rapper to another, speaking in the 3rd person may work in hip-hop, but not in politics. Good luck Wyclef!

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The dangers of a Wyclef presidency

August 6, 2010

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-478703

While I congratulate Wyclef on his decision to run for President of Haiti, we have to remember that what we may feel in America is good for foreign people may not always be good for them. As someone who has traveled and worked in 17 countries and has studied international affairs, I have seen this to be the case many times over. One need to only look at the Congo, where Mobutu ruled with an iron fist for over 30 years and was a friend to every U.S. President. He was discovered by George Bush senior in 1957. If the Haitian people want Wyclef, more power to him. I am not doubting his qualifications and no one can doubt his passion. I just think that we should not ignore home grown Haitian leadership just because they may be unknown to us. The results can be catastrophic for the people on the ground.

Haiti child trafficking case is an international problem

February 16, 2010

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-408488

Post speaks about personal experiences with the international adoption community. While my wife was in Ethiopia working with children orphaned from AIDS, she ended up staying in a hotel with a bunch of westerners waiting for babies. One even asked my wife if she could have our baby! While I believe most international adoptions happen legally, there are too many cases where unscrupulous natives partnered with ill-intentioned foreigners create chaotic situations for children. Some think taking a child from their home situation is better because of all the riches in America but despite someone’s living conditions, being with family should take priority. Rather than looking at breaking up families (not to say this is what the missionaries in Haiti were intentionally doing), we who have means should spend our efforts helping to build sustainable societies for those affected. Our best intentions can lead to the gravest of consequences for children internationally

Haiti, We Will Rebuild (a poem)

January 25, 2010

Why are so many masses of my countrymen no longer alive?
Why did I survive?
Why didn’t I perish beneath the rubble?
Why has the pride in my island not crumbled?
Bearing wondrous witness to death & devastation
Birthing bountiful inspiration
For as long as I’m breathing I must keep on believing
Appealing to a higher power to see me through this
For there will never be an answer as to why we went through this
I may not have money but I have arms to hug hope
A rope of resiliency reaching down to my brother
A ladder of love reaching up to my mother
Pour Ayiti je vais reconstruir mon pays
The hope for my country depends on me
With some special assistance from my neighboring countries
I will emerge even stronger, my people more proud
Stormy clouds shall pass et le soleil will shine encore une fois
An earthquake shook my country but not my pride tu vois
An aftershock rocked my home but not my spirit
They say when you’re knocked down to land on your back
For if you can look up you can get up so I’m standing tall
Some buildings may have collapsed but my faith will never fall
My land will rise once again because I chose to get up
To never let up on my people, I was chosen to live up
So watch me rise like the phoenix from the ashes of despair
Watch my people rebuild like never before
With you and me working side by side
This quake will be a mere tremor with the passage of time
So I say sak passé to a new day dawning
From mourning the dead I’ll give birth to a new morning
A quake clipped my wings but soon again I’ll be soaring!

Are we “Ethiopializing” Haiti?

January 23, 2010

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-397675#

Post asks if we are doing Haiti & Haitians a disservice by continually showing ONLY destruction, dead bodies, and half naked people. As was the case with Ethiopia in the 80s, the average American who knew nothing about the country only had an image of starving kids with big bellies that led some to ignorantly say they were eating too much. Fast forward to Congo and we only think of women being raped and pillaged there. If we continue to not show prideful images of Haitians helping each other as opposed to only begging for aid, we will simply create an image of another sob-story people who cannot survive without assistance from us-their saviors. We need to continue to assist but also make sure we’re looking at Haitians helping Haitians as well as policies that we construct that may be hurting Haitians.

Keep Haiti in our minds, not just our hearts (video)

January 18, 2010

http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-394695

Post asserts that though it is crucial that we do all we can to help our Haitian family, it is also important to keep Haiti in mind after the rebuilding is done. As we reconstruct Haiti, we should also look at reconstructing our policies related to Haiti and other impoverished nations, particularly on the African continent. 2 black nations have become household names in the last month because of terrorism and a natural disaster. We should use these events to become more knowledgeable of issues such as discrimination between Haitians living in Florida vs. Cubans. If we don’t become more knowledgeable of issues such as these, or the real reasons for Haiti’s level of destitution (including corrupt leaders), we will just be waiting to give money to the next cause that may have been preventable on the level we’re seeing.